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Anti-vax nurse attempts to Establish COVID vaccines make you magnetic

A 13-year-old shows off his bandage after getting a COVID-19 vaccination.  Unfortunately, he did not get any magnetic powers, Image: Scott Heins/Getty Images By Christianna Silva2021-06-10 15:51:45 UTC There’s a hot new conspiracy about COVID-19 vaccinations and, boy, is it magnetic. During a meeting of a state legislature health committee on Tuesday in Cleveland, Ohio,…

A 13-year-old shows off his bandage after getting a COVID-19 vaccination.  Unfortunately, he did not get any magnetic powers,
A 13-year-old shows his bandage off after getting a COVID-19 vaccination.  Regrettably, he did not get any magnetic powers,

Image: Scott Heins/Getty Images

By Christianna Silva

There’s a sexy new conspiracy about COVID-19 vaccinations and, boy, is it magnetic.

During a meeting of a state legislature health committee on Tuesday at Cleveland, Ohio, Dr. Sherri Tenpenny, a physician and”expert witness,” testified that COVID-19 vaccines could make people magnetic. (They absolutely can’t.) That felt weird enough, but it got even stranger. A girl who said she was a registered nurse tried to establish Dr. Tenpenny’s assertion by sticking some stuff to her torso.

Wow. An anti-vaccine nurse in Ohio tried to establish that the Vaccines Cause Magnetism theory within an state legislative committee. The demonstration didn’t go to program pic.twitter.com/0ubELst4E8

— Tyler Buchanan (@Tylerjoelb) June 9, 2021

“Vaccines do harm people,” the nurse explained. “By the way, so I just found out something when I was on lunch and I wanted to show it to you. We were talking about Dr. Tenpenny’s testimony about magnetic vaccine crystals, so this is what I found out.”

She then pulled out a key and a bobby pin — bobby pins are generally coated in vinyl — and pressed the key to her torso. The key stuck. Really makes you think, does not it?

“Explain to me why the key sticks to me,” she inquired. “It sticks to my neck too,” she said, before pressing on the key to her throat and having it promptly fall off. She also tried and didn’t get the bobby pin to adhere, as she said,”Yeah so if somebody can explain this, that would be great.”

Not just a damning series of her magnetism.

Videos and photographs of other individuals sticking magnetic things for their bodies soon started popping up everywhere. A number of these were severe, but a lot of them have been in jest (we hope). Comedian Dana Goldberg tweeted a movie of herself with a secret stuck to her forehead and a

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